List of the classified records released to WikiLeaks by PFC Bradley Manning

Combined Information and Data Network Exchange (CIDNE) – Iraq database of SIGACT (significant activities)
Manning admitted to copying the CIDNE-Iraq database to his personal computer on Jan. 8, 2010 while stationed in Forward Operating Base (FOB) Hammer near Baghdad. Manning submitted the CIDNE-Iraq database to WikiLeaks on Feb. 3, 2013 while he was on leave in the Washington, D.C. area after his outreach efforts to the Washington Post, New York Times, and Politico failed.

Combined Information and Data Network Exchange (CIDNE) – Afghanistan database of SIGACT (significant activities)
Manning admitted to copying the CIDNE-Afghanistan database to his personal computer on Jan. 8, 2010 while stationed in Forward Operating Base (FOB) Hammer near Baghdad. Manning submitted the CIDNE-Afghanistan database to WikiLeaks on Feb. 3, 2013 while he was on leave in the Washington, D.C. area after his outreach efforts to the Washington Post, New York Times, and Politico failed.

“Apache collateral murder” video showing a U.S. Air Weapons Team shooting and killing two Reuters staff members and other unarmed civilians in Iraq on July 12, 2007
According to Manning’s written statement, the video was brought to the attention of the Temporary Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (T-SCIF) staff by a targeting analyst in mid-February of 2010. His T-SCIF colleagues debated whether the AWT crew violated the Rules of Engagement. The video showed the U.S. Apache helicopter shooting up a bongo truck carrying unarmed civilians, including children, at least 6 times after the truck had pulled over to help a wounded Reuters journalist. Manning copied the Apache video file to his personal computer on February 15, 2010 and submitted an edited version of the video to WikiLeaks on February 21, 2010.

Video of U.S. airstrike in Granai (Farah Province) Afghanistan
Manning wrote that he discovered the Granai airstrike video in late March of 2010. The airstrike killed 100 to 150 Afghan civilians, many of whom were women and children. Manning downloaded the video of the strike as well as the Army’s 15-6 (informal) investigation reports and documents of the incident and submitted them to WikiLeaks in late March 2010. However, the prosecution alleged that Manning leaked this video less than 2 weeks after he was deployed to Iraq – in late November 2009. The prosecution claimed that a “forensic duplicate” of the Granai video was found on the work computer of Jason Katz, a Department of Energy employee at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, on Dec. 15, 2009.

Joint Task Force Guantanamo detainee assessment briefs
Manning downloaded more than 750 records and assessment briefs of detainees held at Guantanamo Bay between March 5 and 7, 2010. After copying the documents to his personal computer, Manning submitted the detainee assessment briefs to WikiLeaks on March 8, 2010.

U.S. Army Counter-Intelligence Center (USACIC) report on WikiLeaks
Manning found and copied a USACIC report on WikiLeaks in December 2009. He downloaded the report again and sent the document to WikiLeaks on March 7, 2010.

More than 250,000 Department of State cables
Manning downloaded more than a quarter of a million State Department cables between March 28, 2010 and April 9, 2010. He uploaded the files to WikiLeaks on April 10, 2010.

“10REYKJAVIK13″ cable
“10REYKJAVIK13″ refers to a 2-page Department of State cable published on Jan. 13, 2010 regarding Iceland’s dispute with the United Kingdom and the Netherlands following the financial collapse of one of Iceland’s banks. Manning found the “10REYKJAVIK13″ cable on Feb. 14, 2010 and copied the file to his laptop and sent it to WikiLeaks on Feb. 15, 2010.

Documents on 15 individuals detained by the Iraqi Federal Police for printing “anti-Iraqi literature”
On March 2, 2010, Manning was asked to investigate 15 individuals who were detained by the Iraqi Federal Police for printing “anti-Iraqi literature”. He consulted with an Iraqi translator, who concluded that “anti-Iraqi literature” was “merely a scholarly critique” of the corruption of then-Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s government. After Manning was asked to help the Iraqi Federal Police locate print shops producing similar “anti-Iraqi” literature, he copied the files to his personal computer on March 4, 2010 and sent them to WikiLeaks on March 5, 2010.

Names, emails, and other personal information of 70,000-plus troops in Iraq

Prosecutors alleged that Manning extracted the email addresses and personal information of more than 74,000 service members in Iraq. The information he downloaded on May 11, 2010 included the names, email addresses, rank, and positions of U.S. service members in Iraq.

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12 Comments on “List of the classified records released to WikiLeaks by PFC Bradley Manning

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